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Posts tagged “folsom

David Brown, The Biggest Loser Contestant, Speaks in Sacramento Area, Monday, March 10th

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I don’t own a television. Instead, I subscribe to a service that allows me to watch my favorite TV programs (slightly after they have aired). Completely fascinated with food shows, of course Hell’s Kitchen, Masterchef, Top Chef, etc, are all on my watch list. But, there’s another program I have watched every season since its debut, and that is The Biggest Loser.

The Biggest Loser. I am a fan of the show for so many reasons, (although I do have some minor complaints about it). I have seen so many people transform themselves over the years. Much like I did in my mid twenties when I started exercising and began a more healthy eating regimen.

Well this season (season 15) of The Biggest Loser really had my attention most, and I am not sure why. Maybe it was all the people who ended up being “cast” on the show. Maybe it was the theme this season “Second Chances”. Whatever it was, I was enthralled and couldn’t wait until the next episode. I felt for so many of the contestants. I know all about emotional eating… I used to yo-yo 30 pounds back and forth.

This season, I watched pretty openly, happy to see all of the contestants progress. I really didn’t pick anyone to win or have a “favorite”. I was touched by many of their stories and backgrounds. Everyone deserves a second chance. Period.

When I heard David Brown tell his “story” during this season’s The Biggest Loser, I was almost uncomfortably sad, as I am sure any of you that watch the show were as well. The tragedy of being a widower (and father of two daughters) as a young adult, led to his weight gain as an adult.

At 409 pounds, David Brown was given a second chance and a place on The Biggest Loser ranch. During the time on the ranch and the time before the show’s season finale, David lost an amazing 222 pounds (more than 54% of his body weight).

As anyone who watches The Biggest Loser can attest (especially if they are female ;)), David had the most dramatic makeover (probably in the show’s history)…I’d be lying if I said my jaw did not drop after “makeover week” (WOW) and that I didn’t shed tears for him AND his family’s reaction to is new self. (Brown remarried in 2004 and now has three daughters.) DAMN YOU, MAKEOVER WEEK, making me so emotional!! 😉

To be honest, I didn’t see David coming in on the final path to win, and I am not sure if he did either–but he did something amazing which for so many people is still the hardest thing to do… He took the first step on that path to wellness and weight loss, which David refers to as the “winning step”. Then week by week, he transformed himself. And then took second place in The Biggest Loser triathlon.

After a 222 pound weight loss, and 2.2 million steps logged, he comes to the Sacramento area to tell the story of his journey and as a witness of God. He’ll be at Oak Hills Church in Folsom, CA this Monday, March 10th from 6:30 to 8:00pm.

The venue’s address is 1100 Blue Ravine Rd, Folsom CA.  Tickets are $10 each or $15 per couple. Dinner is included if you pre-register. To pre-register, please contact Kory Lewis. The email is kory dot lewis at bayside online dot com. Hope to see you there!!

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I Ran the Run for Courage: The Race to End Human Trafficking

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I’ll begin by saying that “human trafficking” should just be referred to as “sex slavery” because that’s exactly what it is. Human trafficking is just too light of a term to describe what goes on every day. Even in the United States. Even in my state. Even in Sacramento, California.

There are an estimated 4 to 27 million slaves in the world today. Slavery by modern standards has been broken into 2 categories by Unicef and the US government: Sex Trafficking and Labor Trafficking. Sex trafficking as: “a commercial sex act that is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age.”

And there are 100,000-300,000 sex slaves in the U.S. Right now. In 2013. Typically the victims are young girls (average age is 13) who seek love, affection, approval. Approximately 60% are foster home youths. Vulnerable souls who may be homeless, bullied or orphaned. The statistics are sickening. We live in an evil world.

Some victims don’t report their situation because they are afraid. Or they are shamed. Or maybe they are just loyal to their “master”. Sometimes it’s just hopelessness that leads their silence. My heart is heavy for these broken souls, and that is why I am trying to help the Run for Courage, Inc. organization and Vicki Zito spread her message.

Vicki Zito founded Run For Courage after her 17 year old girl was taken from local suburb and made a sex slave for 8 days before the FBI finally came to her rescue. Following the tragedy, and having never heard the term “sex trafficking”, Vicki Zito, Ashlie Bryant, Stephanie Loos, Amy Johnson, founded Run For Courage, Inc.

Here are some other facts from the Run for Courage website:

  • It is estimated that 100,000 to 300,000 children are being sexually exploited each year in the United States and approximately 1.2 million sex trafficked victims overseas.
  • The average age of the victims recovered in The United States is 13 years; overseas, the average age is 10 years.
  • Trafficking of minor girls is the fastest growing crime in the U.S.
  • Pimps can make up to $652,000 on 4 girls
  • Convictions net 5-8 years in CA
  • With “good behavior” it is much less
  • Convictions net 12-15 years from the Feds

I found out about the organization when a friend of mine (Jed, winner of the 5K for 3 years in a row) ran the race last year and afterward attended a party that Andy and I were having. He was wearing the medal he won and he told us a little about the race and the cause.

I then found Run for Courage online, but it still didn’t register to me how much of a massive problem that sex slavery really is (even locally). It was not until this year then I was sent an email from my blogger buddy Margaret asking if their were any bloggers out there who would be interested in covering the 2013 Race for Courage (taking pictures of the race and writing about it). And then there was the moving interview with Ashlie Bryant I heard on the Armstrong and Getty show. You can listen to the interview here.

I immediately called Erin Walsh (Margaret’s contact for the organization), because my plan was to see if she might be interested in having me actually run the race and write about it from a runner’s point of view. We spoke for a while about the sort of post I would write, and a few days later I was on my way to pick up my race packet at Sports Authority in Folsom.

I was not sure whether I wanted to run the 5K or the 10K… I was eager to try and improve my times for both distances. I finally decided on the 10K, and decided I would try and break 50:00 mins. (My PR at the time was 50:31.)

Everything was perfect the morning of the race. The weather cooperated, and I had plenty to eat and just enough sleep the night before. I put on my running clothes and pinned on my number, and I was ready for battle!

The Run for Courage was one of the best organized local races I have run. There is such a great vibe in the air. There are so many volunteers and sponsors at Run for Courage. Even though we all gathered there together to benefit a cause born out of an unpleasant situation, everyone had a smile on their face. There were even entire families that ran the race together. The course was very well marked and there was always someone to cheer you on and point you in the right direction to keep you on course.

As for me, I ran as hard as I could. The entire time. The course is not an easy one. It is mostly paved, but it is a bit hilly, and there are many parts of the course where I was running on dirt, gravel, and across several foot bridges. I found a few people to run with that really kept me going, but by the fourth mile, I was getting a little tired. I remembered thinking about a training run i had done the week before that was 11.25 miles long. I remember being at the 9th mile and thinking… “it’s only two more miles and we’re done.” So, I applied the same attitude to this race. I told myself that it would all be over in less than 20 minutes. I was not struggling for air, and I was not in pain. I actually felt blessed. So on I went, and I reached the finish line just 11 seconds shy of my goal. I crossed at 50:10, still a new personal record by 20 seconds! My average pace per mile was 8 minutes and 5 seconds. I was pretty thrilled with that.

Thanks to Erin Walsh and Ashlie Bryant for allowing me to be a part of the Run for Courage. I only hope I can encourage my readers to run the upcoming race in Oakland on November 2nd, or to join the race next year.

I hung around a little bit after the race to watch the awards ceremony, and to chat with some others who had also run the race. That day over 2,800 people registered to walk or run and there were 300 volunteers!

You can run the Run for Courage 5K or 10K on November 2nd in Oakland at Lake Merritt. Learn more and register for the race here.

You can visit the Run for Courage Facebook page here.


Great Pumpkin 5K in Folsom is October 28th!

The Great Pumpkin 5K will be held on Sunday, October 28th, 2012 at 9:00am in Folsom, California.

Course Description
The course starts in the parking lot of 2304 E Bidwell Street and is run on the paths of the Humbug Willow Creek Trail along marshes, creeks, and oak woodlands.

Race will feature disposable chip timing. Jogging Strollers are allowed.  Please start at the back of the pack and stay to the right side of path.

Aid stations at the halfway (1.6-mile) point, stocked with hydration and smiling faces!

Race registration is $35. You can register by going here. Registration available online until midnight, Friday, October 26th. You must register no later than Thursday, October 18th to be guaranteed a shirt and size. Provided the event does not sell out, we will accept registration at Packet Pickup race morning.

However, finisher awards, shirts and sizes are not guaranteed for late registrants, so register early!

Packet Pick-Up
Race morning at 2304 E Bidwell Lot (Race Venue), 7:30am to 8:30am Race Day. Plan to arrive no later than 8:15am in order to pick up your packet.

All participants receive entry into a raffle to win one of many great prizes provided by ERT’s generous sponsors and partners.  The raffle will be held before race start so you do not have to wait around after the event if you need to hit the road. (If you have time–great! Hang out and enjoy the refreshments and cheer on the other runners.)

The race will start immediately following the raffle at 9:00am. Refreshments will be provided for all runners and walkers following the race.

All participants will receive a race shirt and custom finisher award. Late/Race Day Registrants are not guaranteed shirts and sizes. Awards will be given for top 3 male and female finishers, and top finishers in age divisions 14 and under, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70+.  Depth of awards will be determined by the participant field.  Award ceremony follows the race.  All winners must be present–awards will not be available for pickup or mailing after event.

You can “like” Elemental Running on Facebook here.